Posts

Showing posts from April, 2015

Hidden the Visible

Image
https://thegenealogyofstyle.wordpress.com/tag/magritte/


Hidden the VisibleThe Son of Man (1964)
René Magritte painted it as a self-portrait. The painting consists of a man in an overcoat and a bowler hat standing in front of a low wall, beyond which is the sea and a cloudy sky. The man’s face is largely obscured by a hovering green apple. However, the man’s eyes can be seen peeking over the edge of the apple. Another subtle feature is that the man’s left arm appears to bend backwards at the elbow.

About the painting, Magritte said: “At least it hides the face partly well, so you have the apparent face, the apple, hiding the visible but hidden, the face of the person. It’s something that happens constantly. Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see. There is an interest in that which is hidden and which the visible does not show us. This interest can take the form of a quite intense feeling, a sort of conflict, one might say, between the …

A is for Apple

Image
https://thegenealogyofstyle.wordpress.com/

A is for Apple
The Beatles‘ accountants had informed the group that they had two million pounds which they could either invest in a business venture or else lose to the Inland Revenue, because corporate/business taxes were lower than their individual tax bills. According to Peter Brown, personal assistant to Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein, activities to find tax shelters for the income that the Beatles generated began as early as 1963–64, when Dr Walter Strach was put in charge of such operations. First steps into that direction were the foundation of Beatles Ltd and, in early 1967, Beatles and Co. The Beatles’ publicist, Derek Taylor, remembered that Paul McCartney had the name for the new company when he visited Taylor’s company flat in London: “We’re starting a brand new form of business. So, what is the first thing that a child is taught when he begins to grow up? A is for Apple”. McCartney then suggested the addition of Apple Core, but th…

The Son of Man in Popular Culture

Image
genealogy of style
https://thegenealogyofstyle.wordpress.com/2015/04/23/the-son-of-man-in-popular-culture/


The Son of Man in Popular Culture Rate This
The Holy Mountain (Alejandro Jodorowsky, 1973) movie poster
René Magritte‘s The Son of Man appears in Alejandro Jodorowsky’s film The Holy Mountain, on a wall in the house of Jupiter. The film was produced by Beatles manager Allen Klein of ABKCO Music and Records, after Jodorowsky scored an underground phenomenon with El Topo (The Mole) and the acclaim of both John Lennon and George Harrison (Lennon and Yoko Ono put up production money).
Robin Williams in Toys (Barry Levinson, 1992). The set design, costumes, and promotional poster reflect the painting’s style.

Carl Warner’s Whimsical Food Landscapes

Image
brain
http://www.brainpickings.org/2011/11/09/carl-warner-food-landscapes/

Carl Warner’s Whimsical Food Landscapesby 
What the London skyline has to do with asparagus, rhubarb, and Pink Floyd. British photographic artist Carl Warner, whom you might recall as one of our favorite architects of edible landscapes, is a master of food and form, crafting astounding fantasy food landscapes that are part Ansel Adams, part Anthony Bourdaine, part your childhood daydreams dreamt from the counter of your grandmother’s kitchen. These miniature vignettes are painstakingly hand-crafted with only minimal Photoshop involvement and exude a kind of vibrant whimsy that stands in stark contrast with the mundane, dully ordinary ingredients Warner uses. Food Landscapes collects Warner’s most magnificent work, alongside detailed production notes and ingredient lists for each scene. Making landscapes out of food seems like a rather unusual thing to do for a living, and people often ask, ‘What made …